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Noise Pollution and Hearing Loss

by Jane Meggitt

If you or someone you know would like to learn more about hearing loss and how to treat it, please feel free to schedule a consultation or contact one of our representatives today!

One out of four U.S. adults is affected with hearing loss, and noise pollution is a major culprit. The situation is so bad that hearing loss has become the third most frequent chronic health problem in the nation, trailing just diabetes and cancer. Noise pollution is so pervasive, most people just throw up their hands and figure it is out of their control. However, there are actions you can take that save your hearing and those of others.

Loud Restaurants

You would think that most diners want a quiet atmosphere in which to enjoy a meal and conversation with dining companions. While there are plenty of restaurants providing just that, far too many serve extraordinarily loud music along with their entrees. Many restaurants have noise levels of up to 80 decibels – bad for their regular patrons, even worse for employees subject to the racket for long hours on a daily basis. If there’s a restaurant you would otherwise enjoy if not for the din, ask for the music to be turned down. If the management won’t comply, dine elsewhere.

Loud Activity Protection

There are some necessary activities that are just plain loud, and little will change that. Mowing the lawn is a good example. The Centers for Disease Control recommends wearing earplugs when mowing the lawn, and it is wise advice. Whether it’s wearing headphones that cancel noise while on airplanes, subways or other loud methods of transportation, or bringing earplugs to a concert, there are dozens of ways to protect your precious hearing from a constant onslaught of loud noise.

Download a Decibel Meter

Carrying a decibel meter around doesn’t make sense for most people. However, you can download a decibel reader on your smartphone, allowing you to make good noise choices when out in public. For example, if you’re deciding which particular restaurant to eat in or bar in which to have a drink, the decibel meter can help you figure out the quietest area in the establishment.

Listen to Music at Reasonable Levels

Attending lots of loud concerts or listening to loud music is inevitably going to damage hearing. Think about all of the rock stars who suffer from significant hearing loss. There’s nothing wrong with listening to music on earbuds, as long as you don’t crank up the volume. Your phone can reach a decibel level of up to 100, so make sure you keep it at a lower volume to protect yourself.

If you or someone you know would like to learn more about hearing loss and how to treat it, please feel free to schedule a consultation or contact one of our representatives today!

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