` Hearing Loss Hotline for Parents | News
    Home      Contact

Hearing Loss Hotline for Parents

by Jane Meggitt

If you or someone you know would like to learn more about hearing loss and how to treat it, please feel free to schedule a consultation or contact one of our representatives today!

Hotlines help people struggling with all sorts of issues, whether they are emergencies or those seeking advice for their problems. Now, the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell) has set up an English and Spanish hotline specifically for parents of children with hearing loss. For parents dealing with a child’s hearing problems, help is now just a phone call away. It’s part of the organization’s Listen-Learn-Link. AG Bell partnered with Cochlear and ReSound, two major hearing technology companies in this undertaking. The number for the hotline is 1-833-575-5465, and it is manned from Monday to Friday. Parents who prefer email can use newparenthotline@agbell.org. Those residing outside of North America can arrange for video conference calling.

Early Diagnosis is Critical

Approximately 1.4 babies out of every thousand born have some degree of hearing loss. When diagnosed early, these children can receive support for speech and language development and other social and cognitive skills impacted by hearing loss. Otherwise, parents may not realize their child has a hearing problem until the age of two or so, when the child does not start talking at the usual time. Early diagnosis and therapy can make a tremendous difference in their lives. Ideally, all babies should receive hearing loss screening by the age of six months, and treatment can begin at that time.

Older Children and Hearing Loss

Babies and young children are not the only ones diagnosed with hearing loss. Sometimes, hearing loss does not manifest itself until a child is older. That type of hearing loss often results from prolonged exposure to loud noise. An estimated 12.5 percent of all children between the ages of six and 19 suffer from some degree of hearing loss, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Types of Hearing Loss

Hearing loss in babies is generally congenital, meaning they were born with hearing difficulties. Genetics plays a role, but non-genetic factors may also cause congenital hearing loss. The latter include birth complications, such as an infection or lack of oxygen. Premature babies are more likely to suffer hearing loss than those of normal birthweight. Certain medications taken by the mother during pregnancy, including some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief may cause infant hearing loss. The same holds true if the mother had an infection during the pregnancy, or if she smoked or drank alcohol excessively while carrying the fetus.

Acquired hearing loss occurs after birth, and may result from a perforated eardrum, loud noise exposure, frequent ear infections, taking certain medications or experiencing head trauma.

If you or someone you know would like to learn more about hearing loss and how to treat it, please feel free to schedule a consultation or contact one of our representatives today!

Call 877-631-9511 for FREE Consultation

Contact Us
877-631-9511


Required Fields *



Find Local Offices